Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Years gone by



Years gone by
With grandparents two doors down
Two aunties there too

Two cousins tucked in
Fathers had been called to war
In Britain's dark hour

The war was raging
Housing appropriated
For the duration

One uncle at sea 
The other stationed far away
Each child same story

My dad in London
Keeping things working at night
Dowsing the bombs fires

Same for all of them
All they had was constant hope
And fear for us kids

Nobody was spared
Others uncles at front too
All gone to war's call

North Africa, Burma
Fighting in desert, jungle
Patrolling the seas

War's an ugly thing
Making orphans and widows
and peace for us kids

You fought for our homes
You fought for us your children
Now we honor you


Image found at www.flygvapenmuseum.se

21 comments:

  1. I have always respected women who were related to such noble men. Its our duty to boost their courage in times of war and pray for their safe return. It is said in my culture that if a person dies fighting for his country he is granted the highest place in Hereafter..!

    Its a beautiful poem..! Loved it :)
    xoxo

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  2. This is honoring indeed! We often forget to speak of the nucleus of love that causes men and women to leave the very ones they love for their safety. I've seen birds draw the enemy from their nests, more thought for the next generation than for their own safety. And so it plays out again and again. I love how you unite the children who face the same absence, now with an adult understanding of the years. I hope in the future that we who are aging now find our way to a true peace. After all, we all have children, even if they are not our own.

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  3. "Nobody was spared" this is the one and only truth about war when everyone even the children share the same fate and fed with anxiety, fear and heartbreak...however the men who go out to defend their land and fall deserve our honors...you've paid a wonderful homage...

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  4. War efforts by the civilian population were not rightly acknowledged. They remained the 'unsung' heroes. Such a wonderful tribute here oldegg!

    Hank

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  5. yes war does break-up the family... nice clean lines here

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  6. Robin you bring the horrors of wartime to the community. I often hear: "children dont understand." The lens that a child looks through may not be the same but feelings of sadness, fear, terror are felt by all.
    Grateful for your honor for the fallen.

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  7. A beautiful homage, Robin. What it cost them to fight for our safety!!!!!

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  8. A well deserved tribute to all who fight for our countries, but especially to your relatives whom you know personally and grieve them. Very thoughtful poem.

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  9. Your poem really drives home the 'why' of those who fight for the safety of those they love. Lovely tribute.

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  10. yay! what an awesome tribute to your elders OldEgg!!! In some strange way, I was uplifted by this, maybe it's because two of my own uncles are US military veterans. heroes they are, i mean, all of the veterans out there. God bless you OldEgg.

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  11. War is really the ugliest thing.The heroes of the war...who fought to keep their children safe... Those persons who await the homecoming of their fathers, sons or uncles. It's a wonderful tribute to all of them- reminding us how everyone suffers during a war...

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  12. All gone to war's call... what an awful feeling for a child who can't comprehend the entirety of war's ugliness, just searches for it's elders who should be home.

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  13. Old Egg,

    A magnificent tribute to those from your family who went to war on behalf of others. Many lives were lost and many hearts were broken forever and great sacrifices made.
    I feel in the UK, we were rather slow to honour the brave men and women who were involved in WW1, WW2..

    Eileen

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  14. Our elders went through so much for us. We really do need to think back from time to time and realize all that they went through so we could have the life we have today! This poem certainly does honor their memory. Thank you.

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  15. Yes, it was sometime said, back in those days, that we in Australia had been spared the effects of war coming to our country — but the young children of my generation were without fathers in their earliest years, even when those fathers survived to return home eventually.

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  16. This is wonderful. You answered the prompt beautifully. I appreciated the fact that war is not glorified in this poem; you have not veneered or gilded the ugly truth.. war is war is war, and there is no avoiding it. Thanks, Robin. Amy

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  17. The biggest sacrifice..and a fitting reminder for VE day...

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  18. It is proper that you honor them here. Well done.

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  19. Although the anxiety levels were high I think there was a sense of empowerment that is absent today. Modern warfare, at least in Western countries, is something that happens far away, no home front effort required or even much appreciated. You want to show solidarity? Wear a flag pin. At least during the two world wars, one could knit, collect scrap metal, grow a garden or get a factory job and feel like an important contributor. Now it's a choice between feeling helpless or completely disengaged. Then again, it would be better to have no war at all and resolve our disputes with impassioned speeches and perhaps a round or two of checkers.

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  20. A strong poem honoring those who lived it.

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  21. A fitting tribute to forebears who did so much so that we could enjoy life as we do today...

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