Saturday, May 16, 2015

I'll take to the road



Just like a prodigal son
Grieving for my birthright
I wend my way from the tavern
and light candles of remorse

What did I find in the city?
What help in the beer house?
What treasures in whoredom?
and did I learn from wastefulness?

None, for I'll take to the road
Well off the beaten track
With the sun on my sad face
and the rain in my lank hair

Where tarmac turns to gravel
Where footsteps falter on hardship
Where nature's wild things roar
and rushing mountain streams sing

Like an old repentant man
I now return to my roots
To rediscover my life
and plant my feet firmly home

Image found at www.helpformylife.org

10 comments:

  1. This dusty hot road turned around on the last verse...just like Dorothy the best road is the one that takes you home...albeit she didn't indulge in whoring but still...whatever the misadventure we live and learn and what better place to tell our stories then when our feet are back through the front door

    ReplyDelete
  2. Love this, especially:
    "Where footsteps falter on hardship
    Where nature's wild things roar"

    and "plant my feet firmly home." --> YES. :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Excellent use of the words in the search for peace and belonging.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wisdom often comes with a price tag.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great wordling - you really got to grips with the concept linking the words.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love the imagery of candles of remorse - so sad - and yet some redemption in the end - getting out of the city and returning to "my roots".

    ReplyDelete
  7. Love seeing where you took these words. The first few lines drew me in very effectively.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Great wordleing ... like the feeling of growing from youthful brash restlessness into reflective wisdom making a kind of circle ... finally returning to ones roots.

    ReplyDelete
  9. You handled this one expertly!

    ReplyDelete
  10. A poem that begins with hopelessness, ends on a faint note of hope!

    ReplyDelete