Wednesday, April 12, 2017

A lucky lad


I was such a lucky lad
Sometimes good and sometimes bad
Roving outside in the wood
Or back at home being good
Then I'd find a cosy nook
And put my nose in a book
Reading lasting in the night
The "Faraway Tree" a delight
But the best for many years
Was "Mary Plain" that brought me to tears

Library gave Mum a job
Great place to escape the mob
Where I wandered down each aisle
So became a bookophile
Before adult read "Cruel Sea"
Expanding my library
With rude words I should not look
Found Neville Shute's many books
"Pied Piper" to "Legacy"
Such sad tales of times relevancy

Books like these I did collect
They had such lasting effect
Classics from Greece and of Rome
Still fill a place in my home
I like Murikami now
And do give Jonasson a go
Living in a world of books
You kiss girls and wade in brooks
Knowingly live in a strange land
As you're equipped with novel in hand

Image found at www.pinterest.com

Information on books referred to:

Faraway Tree - by Enid Blyton
Mary Plain - by  Gwynedd Rae
Cruel Sea - By Nicholas Montserrat
Pied Piper, and Legacy - by Neville Shute
Haruki Murikami - wrote 'Norwegian Wood' and others
Jonas Jonasson - wrote 'The Girl who saved the King of Sweden' and others

12 comments:

  1. Scratch a poet, and you will find a lifelong lover of books and words. I enjoyed this, Robin. Thank you.

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  2. Robin, as I look, at your note, am reminded of the book, "How Green Was My Valley" (1939), by Richard Llewellyn, which I read, as a kid, in that nothing was forbidden, to me, by my parents, that I could read, except horror. Am not a fan of that genre. My dad encouraged us, to read, and talk about what we were reading or had just finish reading.

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  3. 'They had such lasting effect'...they do have that and sometimes they are so very powerful to change one's course of life...a lovely read...

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  4. Enjoyed the poem....and you are really lucky to be around such an atmosphere. ...feeling jealous...:-D

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  5. A world of nature and books – what better for a child? Or for any age!

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  6. There are book people and there are the others.

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  7. How well I remember being immersed in Gene Strattor Porter's "A Girl of the Limberlost". For me, there have always been books ... and words! Your poem is wonderful.

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  8. With a novel in hand, I can go anywhere, and be anyone--and so can you!

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  9. aw yes there is no better place than the library to transform your world

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  10. Lucky are such lads who live wondrous lives with books :)

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